Methodology for a mixed-methods multi-country study to assess recognition of and response to maternal and newborn illness

Related Project: Translating Research into Action (TRAction)
Content Type: Published articles
Authors: Allisyn C. Moran, Danielle Charlet, Supriya Madhavan, Kumudha Aruldas, Marie Donaldson, Fatuma Manzi, Monica Okuga, Alfonso Rosales, Vandana Sharma, Michael Celone, Neal Brandes and James M. Sherry
Published: December 2017

The article is part of the TRAction journal supplement How Households Identify and Respond to Illness: A Systematic Qualitative Study of Recognition and Care-Seeking in Seven Countries.

Although maternal and newborn mortality have decreased 44 and 46% respectively between 1990 and 2015, achievement of ambitious Sustainable Development Goal targets requires accelerated progress. Mortality reduction requires a renewed focus on the continuum of maternal and newborn care from the household to the health facility. Although barriers to accessing skilled care are documented for specific contexts, there is a lack of systematic evidence on how women and families identify maternal and newborn illness and make decisions and subsequent care-seeking patterns. The focus of this multi-country study was to identify and describe illness recognition, decision-making, and care-seeking patterns across various contexts among women and newborns who survived and died to ultimately inform programmatic priorities moving forward.


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